You’re a Genetic Counselor?

Genetic CounselorI’ve always been aware that most people have no idea what I do.  But recently, I’ve discovered a new misconception and view of what a genetic counselor does, and it’s one which I think is worthwhile discussing.

I have recently interacted with a number of people who have expressed the same sentiment; I don’t need counseling so therefore I do not need to meet with a genetic counselor. “My child has a genetic disease, but I don’t need counseling”, “I just need to get my blood drawn for a genetic test, I don’t need counseling”, and most recently, “I don’t need to meet with a therapist, I just spoke with that genetic counselor”. These statements indicate a misunderstanding of what a genetic counselor actually does. You see, genetic counselors don’t do counseling.

Ok, that’s a bit misleading. We do speak with people, and often use counseling techniques in our sessions, most often decision-oriented counseling, crisis counseling, and other psychosocial techniques. Genetic counselors do have training in psychosocial counseling as part of their graduate training, however, any issue which is significant enough to necessitate counseling, should be handled by an actual counselor (therapist, social worker, psychologist, psychiatrist, etc.). I frequently refer patients to speak with therapists about various issues that come up in a genetic counseling session.

So what do genetic counselors do? Well, it’s going to be different in every session. However, the essence includes reviewing one’s medical and family history, family history risk assessment, discussing the features and inheritance of various genetic diseases, identifying appropriate genetic testing, and explaining the risks, benefits, and limitations of that testing, interpreting and explaining the significance of genetic test results, and identifying resources for the patient or family. I often see myself as a patient educator and a patient advocate.

This consultation is important for a number of reasons.

1-      Genetic tests are very specialized. I’ve said this before, but there is no one “catch all” genetic test. If you need genetic testing, it’s the genetic counselor’s role to make sure the correct test is being ordered.

2-      You need to provide informed consent when a genetic test is being done. This means that prior to having a genetic test done, you need to understand the risks, benefits, and limitations of that testing. All of those things are explained in a genetic counseling session, and informed consent is obtained.

3-      Interpretation of genetic test results is complicated and must be done in the context of personal and family history. This is what genetic counselors are trained to do!

4-      Pursuing genetic testing is always YOUR choice. Often there are even multiple testing options in front of you. It’s always up to you to decide if you want to do testing, and what testing you want to do. Genetic counselors specialize in helping people make the best decisions for themselves.

So is the name genetic counselor deterring people from meeting with us? Should the name be changed to a genetic consultant?

To learn more about genetic counseling, visit the NSGC (National Society of Genetic Counselors) website at www.nsgc.org

 

Posted on December 17, 2013, in Chani's posts and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Great post, Chani! I agree, most people have no idea what we do and there are definitely a lot of misconceptions. I think that’s a brilliant idea to change the name to consultant, rather than counselor. You should bring that to NSGC if you haven’t already!

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