Educating Our Educators: Part 3

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A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to meet with some of the Rabbis and educators at the Manhattan Jewish Experience (MJE) on Manhattan’s West Side. MJE is a cutting edge program for young Jewish professionals in their 20’s and 30’s, with little or no background in Judaism who are interested in connecting more to each other, to their community, and to Judaism. MJE is a place where young men and women can explore Jewish life and meet new people.

Prior to our session, we had begun to discuss some of the issues related to Ashkenazi Jewish carrier screening which were unique to this community, but I was definitely not prepared for how unique the needs of this community are!

Broaching the topic of genetic testing for this community is completely different than for individuals who grew up hearing and knowing about it. Many couples who come to our office for carrier screening are already familiar with my shpiel. However for many in this community, the idea that they could potentially be at risk to have a child with a genetic disease specifically because they are Ashkenazi Jews is a completely new concept.  Thinking about when is the right time to bring up the concept of Jewish genetic disease carrier screening and when the right time for having the testing done was also definitely a challenge. Especially when you are trying to make sure that these individuals and couples don’t get overwhelmed by the concern that they could have a child who is affected.

As always, there is no “cookie-cutter model” which will work for each couple and individual, but I believe the best line from our discussion was, “this doesn’t have to be stressful.” Carrier screening is, and should be seen as routine. This does not need to add on unbelievable stress for an individual or to a relationship.

We’re looking forward to working with the MJE in the future, as they continue to determine how best to approach their community on these issues.

Posted on November 16, 2012, in Chani's posts and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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