What to Expect: The Cancer Genetics Appointment

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We’ve already spoken about two of the most common genetics visits (prenatal and pediatric). The third common genetics visit is for cancer genetics. You might be sent to speak to a genetic counselor because you’ve had either a personal or family history of cancer. Usually we are concerned when many individuals in one family are diagnosed with cancer, specifically at young ages (<50 years old). The concern is that the cancer in your family may have been caused by something hereditary, which could then cause yourself or other family members to have a higher risk for cancer than others in the general population.

At a cancer genetics appointment, you won’t necessarily have genetic testing. The majority of the session is spent reviewing your family history . The genetic counselor will ask you a number of questions about all of the individuals in your family who have had cancer (and those who haven’t!). How are they related to you? What kind of cancer did they have? How old were they when they were diagnosed? Has anyone else in the family had genetic testing before? (Speak with your family before going in for your cancer genetics appointment to find out the answers to these questions!)

Once you’d discussed the family history, the genetic counselor/geneticist will let you know how likely they think it is that the cancer in your family is being caused by something inherited and they will educate you about the specific cancer syndromes they are considering and which gene or genes they recommend testing.

“So what if the cancer in my family is inherited? I wouldn’t want to know if I had a higher chance to develop cancer than other people! I’ll probably just get cancer like everyone else did.”

That is definitely one perspective, but the truth is that the area of cancer genetics is one the most empowering area of genetics now-a-days. If we are able to identify individuals who are at an increased risk for cancer, we can recommend increased screening protocols so that cancer can be detected at an earlier and treatable stage. Additionally, some individuals with a hereditary increased risk for cancer may decide to use chemoprevention (medications which may reduce cancer risk for some women) or undergo preventive surgeries in order to reduce their risk for cancer.

The final decision of whether or not to undergo genetic testing is ultimately up to you, but the genetic counseling visit is vital in order to determine what gene or genes should be tested, and to provide you with the information you need to make that decision.

Posted on December 6, 2012, in Chani's posts and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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