Insurance Coverage and Genetic Testing: Part 1

(image courtesy of www.stockmonkeys.com)

(image courtesy of www.stockmonkeys.com)

As boring as it may seem, I actually get asked this question ALL THE TIME. Both by patients and also while giving talks in the community. People get very excited about the possibility of using genetic testing in their own lives, but wonder, how affordable is it really?

Here are a few things that I’ve learned over the years, which may help you navigate that big wide world of insurance coverage for genetic testing. (Use this helpful insurance terminology dictionary to help you through the post!)

Most of the time, genetic testing is treated like any other lab test. When the lab bills your insurance company, most of the time the genetic testing is covered the same way other lab tests would be covered. You may be responsible for your co-insurance and deductible. This differs by insurance policy! You should find out what your insurance’s policy is! Now, when your doctor checks your cholesterol, if that test costs $60, even if you are responsible for 30% of the cost, your “out of pocket” charge is not so significant. Genetic testing on average costs anywhere from a few hundred dollars per test, to thousands of dollars per test. So even if your insurance “covers” the testing, your co-insurance or deductible may leave you responsible for a large amount of money.

Now, there are a few exceptions to this:

Exception 1: Your insurance has a policy whereby it does not cover ANY genetic testing.  This is not very common, but some insurance policies state straight out, that they do not cover ANY genetic testing under any circumstances. I have seen these policies before. If you are considering undergoing genetic testing, you should call your insurance company and ask if they have any specific policies about genetic testing. Typically they can direct you to the policy on their website so that you can read through it. Nowadays, as genetic testing becomes more commonplace, more insurance companies are developing genetic testing policies about what they will and will not cover, so it is worthwhile to look into this for your specific insurance plan!

Exception 2: Your insurance will only cover genetic testing if the correct “indication” or “code” is provided. Genetic testing is conducted in a medical model (even if it doesn’t always seem that way!) This means that it is ordered by a medical professional because of a certain indication. So in order for your insurance company to actually agree to covering the genetic test, the correct indication need be provided! For example, if you want to have genetic testing for Marfan syndrome, but you don’t have any of the signs or symptoms of this genetic disease, your insurance company will likely not cover the testing because there is no “indication” for it. For specific tests you may need to meet the “testing criteria” in order for your insurance company to cover the test.

Exception 3: Your insurance will only cover genetic testing if it is done at an “in network lab” Many insurance companies want you to use specific labs when you have your testing done. This may be easy for having your cholesterol checked (as that is a common test) however because genetic tests are unique, there may only be one or two labs in the country who do the testing that you need. So your insurance might cover your testing if it was done at Lab A, but Lab A doesn’t offer that test, it is only offered at Lab Q which is both out of state, and out of your insurance’s network.

Unless you’ve had to muddle through insurance policies and medical bills, a lot of this may seem new to you. The truth is, they don’t even teach us this stuff in school! Insurance issues tend to be one of those things you learn “on the job” as a genetic counselor (and one of the things you keep on learning as the field changes). It is definitely worthwhile for you to research your own health insurance plan’s benefits and your financial responsibilities, so you don’t have any surprises when it comes to your medical bills and insurance coverage.

Posted on May 21, 2014, in Chani's posts and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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