Insurance Coverage and Genetic Testing: Part 3

Image courtesy of http://401kcalculator.org

Image courtesy of http://401kcalculator.org

Before I move on to other (and potentially more interesting) topics to blog about, there are just a few more important things related to genetic testing insurance coverage which are worthwhile discussing. Remember that this insurance terminology dictionary should be helpful for other topics which I don’t discuss here.

I’ve mentioned before how expensive genetic testing can be. Depending on the test, and what technology is being used, each separate genetic test could cost up to a few thousand dollars. When multiple genetic tests are being done, this can rapidly add up. Your insurance company knows this and therefore, has very specific criteria which govern when they will cover genetic testing.

This post is mostly about insurance preauthorization (“pre-auth”). This is otherwise known as a prior authorization, precertification, or predetermination. Different insurance companies may have different names for this process, but the gist is usually the same. This is a process that you or your healthcare provider initiates with your insurance company whereby you ask them to determine if they will pay for a specific service (in our case, genetic testing). Often times, your insurance company will require that you go through the preauthorization process before you pursue genetic testing.

So what is involved in a preauthorization? The insurance company will request that you give them a lot of information about the genetic testing which is being done.  They will want the name of the lab which is actually performing your testing, the name of the doctor ordering your testing, and all of the applicable identification numbers, certification numbers, and contact information associated with your doctor, and the genetics lab.

Then, they’ll want to know where the genetic test is being done and exactly which test will be ordered. It is important to understand that when you do a pre-auth, you cannot rely on the insurance agent involved in your case to know about each and every test that exists. Just saying “a genetic test” or even “a genetic test for cystic fibrosis” will not be enough information for them. This is because there may be multiple genetic tests available for cystic fibrosis, each with its own testing methodology and precision (and therefore price!). Each genetic test actually had a code (or sometimes multiple codes) which identifies it to the insurance company and explains to them what exactly is being done. These codes are called CPT codes and you can get the precise CPT codes you need from the lab performing the test.

The next piece of information the insurance company needs is the indication for your testing, which is also provided in the form of a code called an ICD-9 code. ICD-9 codes vary from broad to specific; some examples include “family history of breast cancer” as an indication for BRCA testing and “café au lait spots” as the reason for ordering genetic testing for neurofibromatosis type 1. ICD-9 codes are important to the insurance companies because they are used to determine if the genetic testing is appropriate for you. You (or your doctor) cannot order a genetic test just because you want it done, and expect your insurance to cover it.

Finally, once this preauthorization has been started, your insurance company will want clinical information. This may be in the form of medical records, imaging studies, or pedigrees, or they may request that a letter of medical necessity be submitted by your healthcare provider. A letter of medical necessity is basically a document written by your healthcare provider that explains their argument for why the insurance company should pay for your testing. Often times it not only includes information about your medical history, but also information about how the testing will be helpful for your future care, and specifically what might change in your medical care based on this testing. It might even cite recent medical literature where genetic testing has made a major difference in situations similar to yours.

The insurance preauthorization process can take anywhere from weeks to months, depending on your insurance company. And even if the preauthorization is approved, it is never a guarantee that your testing will be covered. If the preauthorization is “denied” there is often an appeals process that you can go through to try and change their minds.

So you can see that the process is quite complex and time consuming. Physicians and genetic counselors have a lot of experience with pre-auths, so do not be shy to ask for help if you are overwhelmed with the process!

Posted on July 31, 2014, in Chani's posts and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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