A Plea to Science Writers

newspaperI read a lot of articles. Being that I work in the field of genetics, not only do I have a Google alert which sends me articles relevant to my work, I also have the benefit of my family and friends sending me articles which they see as relevant to my work. Sometimes I get the same article sent to me 3 or 4 times, because when someone comes across an article even peripherally related to genetics, they think of me, and send it along (Thanks, Dad!). On occasion I even speak to reporters who are in the position of writing some of these articles, and I try to educate them as best I can, and give them the necessary information so that they can convey it to their readership. So for all of those writers out there, those I’ve spoken to, and those I haven’t, I have a very important message for you:

You matter. Your job is so unimaginably important, you may not even realize it. You are presenting often complex scientific concepts to the community. For some, reading your article is the first time that they have even heard about the topic or the first time they have started to think critically about it. This exposure is your one opportunity, and it’s our (the medical community’s) opportunity too. Most people are not proficient in the sciences, and particularly in the realm of genetics, and much education is needed as genetics and genetic technologies become increasingly relevant in our day to day lives.  Individuals will read your article and form opinions about how your topic affects their life, based on what you write! For this reason, it is SO important that the information you present is both accurate and clear.

This may sound obvious, but sadly, I come across many articles, specifically those written about genetics, where there are glaring issues; scientific terms used incorrectly, statements made which are false, and quotes misused. As a genetic counselor, I read these articles and the mistakes drive me nuts. However, it’s the unsuspecting community who suffers from these inaccuracies, as they don’t know any better but to accept it at face value and believe what they are reading; what YOU are writing. Sometimes, when you try and “simplify” it, what you end up doing is totally missing the boat, and your work ends up misinforming the public, rather than educating them.

So, to you, science writers, please be responsible with your valuable work. Many members of the scientific community (granted, I can’t speak for everyone!) would much rather proofread your writing for scientific accuracy than see another article published which sets us back in our efforts to continue to educate the public. Use us as a resource. It will help us all in the long run, improve the accuracy of your work, and increase public access to reliable information about science, medicine, and genetics.

Posted on June 16, 2015, in Chani's posts and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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