Mental Illness Awareness Week and New Lesson!

MIAW-sticker-circle-2.5With the support of the Jewish Federation of Western Connecticut, we are grateful to be able to launch our newest lesson on MyJewishGeneticHealth.com addressing issues of mental health and mental illness in the Jewish community during Mental Illness Awareness Week. This lesson has been many months (and even years) in the making, and here’s why.

Since we launched MyJewishGeneticHealth.com back in May of 2013, we began getting requests to address mental illness in the Jewish community. While we had identified mental illness as an important issue to tackle, it was honestly a bit daunting, and we wanted to get the lesson right. Month after month, we would opt to develop other lessons, since we weren’t quite sure about how to approach mental illness on our online education platform. However, whenever we came across a particularly striking article or useful resource on the topic, we filed it away, hoping that it would come in handy once we were ready to prepare our mental illness lesson.  And the requests kept coming in.

At first, we tried identifying an expert lecturer who could do it all. We wanted it to be a person who could approach mental illness in a sensitive and community-oriented way, yet still speak about the hereditary components to mental illness. Finding such a person felt almost impossible. We finally realized that we didn’t need just one person, but similar to someone suffering from mental illness, we needed a team. So we changed up our model, and were able to identify three different expert lecturers to approach mental illness from different perspectives: the psychologist/community perspective, the genetic counselor/hereditary perspective, and the mental illness advocate/personal perspective. We really hope that listening to their videos is informative, eye-opening, and inspiring.

And that repository of articles and resources? Oh we went through that too. Days were spent poring over articles, listening to personal experiences, identifying and speaking to support groups, and becoming entrenched in the world of mental illness. It is heavy, and yet, unbelievably important.

About 1 in 5 (20% of) adults in the U.S. experience a mental illness. These numbers are not anticipated to be much different in the Jewish community. Mental illness is VERY common, and unfortunately, there is a still great deal of stigma in the Jewish community associated with mental illness, stemming from concerns about marriageability. This lesson is not just for those who suffer from, or have suffered from mental illness, it is for the whole community. Chances are, even if no one in your family has suffered from mental illness, one of your friends, neighbors, or co-workers has. As with most things, a little bit of education, awareness, and understanding can go a long way. Ignoring the issue doesn’t make it go away, it just means that as a community we are not addressing it, and people aren’t getting the help that they need.

We decided to launch this lesson during Mental Illness Awareness Week and around World Mental Health Day, which this year, falls on the heels of the Jewish holiday season. Preparing this lesson has given us at the Program for Jewish Genetic Health a great deal of perspective and has made us take pause to consider how deeply some in our community are suffering.  Our hope is that this lesson will stick with all of us as we exit this season of introspection, and that there will be takeaway lessons that can have an impact on individuals, families and the greater Jewish community.

Posted on October 12, 2015, in Chani's posts and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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