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Preparing for Passover- the genetics edition

matza clipartAs everyone else in the Jewish world is gearing up for Passover by cleaning, cooking, and planning their Seders, I am thinking about how to best convince you to use the opportunity of a holiday to discuss your family health history!

Hopefully, I no longer need to convince you that gathering information about your family medical history is a worthwhile activity, but If I do, I will remind you, that far better than any genetic test, your family health history can help you and your healthcare providers determine what medical issues you are at risk for, and subsequently, how to best care for you.

Almost a year ago, we told you about a great new resource to help you start the conversation specifically related to histories of breast cancer. You can learn more at http://www.treeoflifebrca.org/

You can also use this family history tool created by the Surgeon General, or these guidelines to learn what questions to ask, and how to take your own family history. Some additional instructions or family history guides can be found on the NSGC website here.

We know that discussing your family medical history may feel like an uncomfortable and nosy task, but your family medical history is part of your heritage and has major implications for your own health, and the health of your family members.

Wishing you a happy and healthy Passover, from the Program for Jewish Genetic Health!!

When TV and genetics meet: Reflections on Grey’s Anatomy and BRCA

dna tvGuest Blogger, Allison Grant, reflects on the difficult decisions patients face following the identification of a BRCA mutation. 

In the middle of January I began watching, or as I will shamelessly admit, re-watching, the television series, Grey’s Anatomy. After being wooed by the drama and attractive doctors during my first time watching, I was able to focus more on the “medicine” and on medical ethics the second time around. To my surprise and delight, an episode in season two, Let It Be, closely followed the case of a woman named Savvy who was found to carry a BRCA mutation. Although Savvy did not have cancer, she had seen ovarian cancer take the lives of her mother, sister, and cousin. Savvy and her husband traveled to Seattle to seek advice from their close friends and doctors, the Shepherds, and to decide whether or not to move forward with surgery. Although her husband disagreed, Savvy eventually opted to have a bilateral prophylactic mastectomy, oopherectomy, and hysterectomy (removing both breasts, ovaries, and the uterus). The decision was not made lightly, and was made only after considering all of the statistics, risks, and consulting with appropriate health care professionals, including a genetic counselor.

I applaud Shonda Rhimes for writing and producing this episode in a medically accurate way that, in my opinion, also did a great job of showcasing how a critical medical decision such as this one impacts interpersonal interactions and relationships. Different opinions, and the subsequent social and emotional interpersonal hardships that result, were presented through Savvy’s relationship with her husband, as well as with one of her doctors.

As I was watching this episode I was pained by the stress felt by Savvy, the tension that it created in her marriage, and the difficult anticipation of the life-altering surgeries she was about to endure. For a few seconds I questioned my unwavering belief that knowledge is power. If Savvy had not known about her BRCA mutation, she would not have been facing difficult decisions and these hardships (a fact that some people believe argues against genetic testing in the absence of compelling risk). But I took a step back and looked at this case from a wider perspective, and apparently so did Shonda Rhimes. Personally, I do believe that, in most situations (including this one), knowledge is power. I believe that medical education and awareness about one’s own health are critical components to leading a healthy life. To turn a blind eye when science is offering a chance to proactively enhance one’s health and life expectancy is a private choice, but one that I would argue is made out of fear and a lack of understanding of the risks that can be avoided with the benefit of crucial, and now available, medical information. This sentiment guided Savvy’s experience. After meeting with her gynecologist and genetic counselor, she became empowered to take charge of her health and made an informed decision that she felt was best. In reflecting on her decision she states, “I know what I’m losing. I get it. But think about what I’m gaining. My life. This gives me a shot.”

That is why I love my job–why I love working with professionals trained in genetics, who promote the sentiment that knowledge is power. We give people a shot.

Allison Grant is currently the study coordinator for the Program for Jewish Genetic Health‘s BRCAcommunity Study. She will be attending medical school in the fall. Learn more about BRCA testing at BRCAcommunity.com

Educating about BRCA: The recurring personal questions that trickle in

BRCA questions

January 2016

Reflecting on 2015, we realized that the Program for Jewish Genetic Health gave around 40 live talks over the course of the year, to a wide variety of target audiences (not to mention the online “lessons” we release on MyJewishGeneticHealth.com to a worldwide audience). In thinking about the talks I personally have given over the last few months, I realized that many times the questions come after the Q&A portion, even weeks after. Sometimes the “asker” was aware of the fact that their question was too personal in nature, other times the asker may have thought their question would seem naïve. Occasionally, the asker has been thinking for a while about the topic and comes up with an inquiry that is rather deep.

Here are two examples of recurring personal questions that I have received after my BRCA-centered talks.  As a brief review, mutations in the BRCA genes predispose women and men to developing certain kinds of cancers including breast, ovarian, pancreatic, and more. BRCA mutations can run in families and be inherited by children.  Women and men who are shown by genetic testing to carry BRCA gene mutations have options to reduce and manage their cancer risks. About 1 in 40 individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish descent are believed to carry a BRCA mutation, even if there is no significant incidence of BRCA cancers in their families.

Question 1: My grandmother had XX cancer and my aunt had XX cancer. Do you think I need to consider BRCA testing?

The answer to this one is easy—I always remind the asker that I am not a genetic counselor or a genetic healthcare provider, and I advise them that they should consider meeting with one of those professionals to discuss their family cancer history. A good online resource for finding a genetic counselor anywhere in the US and Canada is http://nsgc.org/p/cm/ld/fid=164 (make sure to search under the ‘cancer’ in ‘types of specialization’). I also advise them to try to collect as much family cancer history information (including cancer type and age of diagnosis) as possible, so that if they ultimately decide to pursue genetic testing for hereditary cancer, the most appropriate (and most current) test can be ordered based on that family history.

Question 2: Given the 1 in 40 carrier rate of BRCA mutations in Ashkenazi Jews, have you yourself gotten tested?

For a long time, the answer was no, I am just not ready. The decision to pursue genetic testing is a very personal one, and several factors need to be considered including whether the timing is right to deal with the knowledge and its implications. More recently, the tides have turned for me, in part due to two comments that reverberate in my mind and heart. The first is something one of our Program genetic counselors likes to say–“Finding out that one has a BRCA mutation doesn’t change anything about whether that mutation is there or not…finding out allows an individual to be empowered to consider available options.”  The other is a sentence from a recent New York Times piece by the author Elizabeth Wurtzel after her cancer diagnosis and ensuing surgery and chemotherapy—“I could have avoided all this if I had been tested for the BRCA mutation.”

Part of me appreciates that audience members reserve their very personal questions at the end of (and especially during :)) my talks, since usually these questions do not have generalizable value. Maybe though, in the realm of genetics and cancer prevention, every “story” has the potential for a broadly relevant take home message.

PLEASE PASS THE TISSUES

tissues

Yesterday I made the whole team cry. Thankfully it wasn’t because I was making unreasonable requests related to productivity or deadlines. Instead, I had slotted off the morning so that we could all watch a movie together—Decoding Annie Parker (2013; we borrowed it from a local library). Without spoiling the entire plot for our readers, suffice it to say that the movie, based on actual events, follows a woman (Annie Parker) who has a strong family and then personal history of cancer. In parallel, the movie follows the decades of research by Dr. Mary-Claire King and her team on their road to discovering the BRCA1 gene.

We blog about the BRCA1 and the related BRCA2 genes regularly, but as a refresher—certain mutations in these genes lead to an increased risk to develop breast and ovarian cancer, among other cancer types. Additionally, BRCA1/2 mutations can be passed down from parents to offspring, and the chance of having a BRCA1/2 mutation is ten-fold greater in individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish descent than it is in the general population. BRCA “status” can be revealed by genetic testing, and BRCA mutation “carriers” have medical management options available to them for reducing the risk of developing cancers or for detecting cancers at a very early (and perhaps treatable) stage if they do develop.

It was my second time seeing the movie, and also my second time crying through it. But this time I also watched it with different eyes, since our Program has gotten more and more involved in the BRCA education and testing realms over the past two years. We talk and talk about the importance of knowing and discussing one’s family medical history. Even in the 1970s, before the concept of hereditary cancer predisposition syndromes existed, Annie Parker (and undoubtedly others like her) had the gut feeling that cancer was running in her family and that it was always lurking in the shadows, waiting to get her. And this caused Annie to live in constant fear and to obsess over things like breast self-exams, library searches, and diets.

In our times, we are fortunate to have the genetic knowledge about the implications of familial BRCA1/2 mutations and the ability to test for carrier status and to guide those who are identified as carriers. While being Ashkenazi Jewish is in and of itself a risk factor for carrying a BRCA mutation, this risk factor is exacerbated by having a family history of BRCA-related cancers. Under current guidelines from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, being Ashkenazi Jewish and having a first or second degree blood relative (meaning a parent, child, sibling, grandparent, grandchild, aunt/uncle or niece/nephew) who has had breast, ovarian or pancreatic cancer at any age would warrant pursuing BRCA testing (along with genetic counseling). Many of us probably fall into that category but don’t realize what this may connote.

Getting back to the movie and all those tears—it’s been a really busy summer at the PJGH so far, and it was definitely a welcome change of pace to have “PJGH movie in the morning.” It was also really powerful and authentic have a good “group cry.” I think the whole experience reinforced our joint commitment to protecting the genetic health of the Jewish community and its future generations. But I still need to think about why the team is rallying for seeing Pitch Perfect together next.

PS The movie we saw (at work) was pretty graphic on multiple levels–consider yourselves warned…

Making Histories: Tree of Life, A BRCA Conversation

Guest Blogger, Sherry Kabran, writes about her amazing new project, Tree of Life, A BRCA Conversation http://www.treeoflifebrca.org:

tree of lifeWhile in mourning, some try to cope with their emotions and loss by writing journals, going to support groups, blogging, running races, attending daily minyans, even starting cancer oriented organizations.  The women in my family found their own ways to accept the loss of Carolyn Raizes Davis, mother and sister, but together we created Tree of Life:  a BRCA Conversation guide for Passover, Shabbat and Rosh Chodesh.

Each guide helps Jews of Ashkenazi descent understand basic facts about hereditary cancer risks from BReast CAncer gene mutations.  The highlighted message is that every family should create a family medical tree, look for red flags and consider genetic testing, if appropriate.  The guides provide a Jewish setting in which to start a serious conversation that might save the 1 in 40 Jews of Ashkenazi descent, who unknowingly has a BRCA gene mutation.

This family project was our suggestion to FORCE (Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered) to further reach out to the Jewish community with a teaching tool.  How could we not try to help?  Carolyn passionately believed in teaching the community about BRCA gene mutation risks and worked closely with The Methodist Hospital doctors in Houston, Texas, to develop an educational program.  Her legacy was EDUCATE anyone who will listen!

My younger sister, Francine, and I decided Passover was an ideal time to have a multi-generational discussion about gathering medical histories.  We know about oranges and coffee beans on the Seder plate.  How about a tree branch, to represent the importance of medical family trees?  Each guide provides: an introduction to start the conversation, a BRCA branch symbol of family trees, a choice of videos, a medical history form to gather health information, Debbie Friedman’s Mi Sheberach prayer and suggestions for next steps.

Of course I googled “Passover & family histories” and found Chani’s post suggesting families do just that, at the Seder table!  Her blog is incredibly informative and thought provoking.  Plus, she told me to take the conversation guide idea and run with it.  Thank you, Chani, for your encouragement.

The Davis/Raizes/Kabran family hopes readers will explore the guides (http://www.treeoflifebrca.org) and decide to use one during family gatherings.  Please tell us about the experience. Also, help us save lives by sharing the website on Facebook and forwarding the free downloadable guides to family members, friends and community leaders (Jewish organizations are beginning to offer BRCA educational programs).  Your suggestions for use of the guides and ways to publicize would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,

Sherry Kabran:   treeoflifebrca@gmail.com

Update Your Genetic Testing! A Different Perspective

to do listLast year I blogged about the importance of updating your preconception carrier screening between pregnancies since new diseases are added to the testing panels pretty often.  This is a topic I am very passionate about and always tell my patients, friends, and relatives. More recently, I started to think about the idea of “updating genetic testing” from a different perspective.

When I take family histories in a cancer genetic counseling session, my patients often tell me that a relative had cancer years ago, but he/she did genetic testing and was negative (ie- had normal results). While this information may be helpful, I often tell them that if the genetic testing was done a while ago, they may want to get more testing done since there are now better testing options in the realm of cancer genetics than there were years ago.

“Updating” in the preconception realm generally refers to adding on additional diseases to the panel, and in the cancer and pediatric realms, it can refer to repeating a test that was already done, using a different testing method with a better detection rate, or pursuing genetic testing–for different genes–that was not available at the time.

Let’s look at individuals who have strong personal or family histories of breast/ovarian cancer (“high risk”) as an example.  In 1996, ‘sequencing’ (scanning the entire gene) for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 became commercially available through Myriad Genetics, the only BRCA testing lab at the time.  At that time, we had already identified that there are three mutations in these genes that are more common among Ashkenazi Jews. Since about 95% of Ashkenazis who have a BRCA mutation will have one of these three mutations, genetic counselors would order ‘multisite’ testing (genetic testing for those three mutations only) for their Ashkenazi high risk patients. As research has advanced, new techniques with higher detection rates were introduced to the market. In 2002, Myriad added a new test to identify 5 large rearrangements in the BRCA genes and in 2006, they added ‘BART’ testing, which looks for large deletions and duplications throughout both genes. With each new technology applied to genetic testing in the same gene, the detection rate has gotten higher. Since then, genetics professionals have recommended that high risk Ashkenazi Jews who test negative for the three common Ashkenazi mutations complete additional genetic testing in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes– full sequencing and BART testing. Multisite testing is still used as the first step (and sometimes only step) of testing Ashkenazis, since it is likely that if one has a mutation, it is one of those three. And to take it a step further, high risk individuals who test negative for all known BRCA mutations are being offered genetic testing for panels of many genes known to be associated with breast/ovarian cancer.

So when my patient with a very strong family history of ovarian cancer tells me that her affected sister had BRCA testing in 2001 and had normal results, I feel a slight sense of relief, but I still have concerns that there is a hereditary component to the family’s cancer. I recommend that they come back in for more comprehensive testing, if possible. The same holds true for pediatric or adult patients with genetic concerns that have not been identified.

Just as family histories are dynamic, and people may develop medical issues over time, so too, the availability and breadth of genetic testing is not static and is expanding at a fast pace. I now tell most of my patients to check back with us in a year or two, because more information or more testing may be available at that time. While it may be hard to keep up, a consultation with a genetic counselor who is knowledgeable in the field might be very helpful to you and your family.  You can find a genetic counselor near you at www.nsgc.org.

Egg Freezing-Now a Job Perk?

8886048502_44698ab556_zBig companies, such as Apple and Facebook, have recently announced that their female employees would be offered free “egg freezing.” The idea behind the process of egg freezing, or oocyte cryopreservation, is that a woman who is not ready to have children may freeze her eggs and later re-implant them in her uterus via an in vitro-fertilization process when she is ready for children.  Freezing eggs puts a halt on their biological activity and, literally, ‘freezes them in time.’

A woman’s eggs stay with her from pre-birth until menopause, so just like we get older, so do our eggs. Our eggs don’t gray and wrinkle, but they certainly age; and the aging process may cause serious issues in the chromosomes of the eggs. You have probably heard that the risk for Down syndrome (a condition caused by having an extra chromosome 21) is increased in older moms. That is because their older eggs are more prone to having errors in meiosis, the process of chromosome division.

The cost of egg freezing nears $10,000 for every round, plus $500 or more annually for storage. It seems like these large companies are finding that losing their valuable employees to maternity leave and family time is detrimental, and that women should feel encouraged to plan out the lives they want if they want to get set on their careers first. Not surprisingly, there has been a lot of buzz around these announcements from Apple and Facebook, ranging from full support to skepticism of using egg freezing for non-medical purposes (one particular piece I enjoyed reading was an op-ed in the New York Times from a few weeks ago).

While career building may be a valid motive to freeze eggs, there are other reasons a woman may consider this process. I have been asked whether egg freezing would be a good option from some women who have not yet met the man with whom they want to build a family, in case they do not get a chance to start their family until they are older. There are also medical reasons a woman may decide to freeze her eggs. For example, women who undergo cancer treatment which may be toxic to their eggs may decide to preserve their eggs before they begin their therapy.  In addition, women facing certain genetic conditions that lead to premature failure of ovarian function may also choose to freeze their eggs–some examples include those with Turner syndrome or fragile X premutation carriers. In addition, women who are BRCA carriers may opt to remove their ovaries to reduce their risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer, but may not be ready to have children. These women could freeze their eggs for a later pregnancy.

Of course I also need to mention that older women who are having babies (whether or not the eggs have been cryopreserved) tend to have older spouses. Because of the large number of cell divisions in spermatogenesis, the process of sperm development, the mutation rate in certain genes is higher in men than women, and increases with age. So we are finding that certain genetic diseases are more common in babies with older dads as well. Such diseases include certain forms of dwarfism, some types of craniofacial disorders, and some more complex diseases such as autism, schizophrenia and cancers.

The American Society for Reproductive Medicine does not recommend the use of egg freezing for purposes of delaying childbearing, since data on safety, the efficacy, and the cost-effectiveness, and emotional risks are insufficient. They say that “marketing this technology for the purpose of deferring childbearing may give women false hope and encourage women to delay childbearing.” Nevertheless, egg freezing for career reasons is a reality. But should it be?

BRCA testing for all Jews? BRCA testing for everyone?

news 2Co-written by PJGH genetic counselors Estie Rose and Chani Wiesman

This week was a very busy and exciting week for us at the Program for Jewish Genetic Health (PJGH)!  Late last week, the New York Times published two articles describing the findings and ramifications of published research conducted by renowned geneticists in the US and Israel. The first article describes a study done by Dr. Ephrat Levy-Lahad at Shaare Zedek hospital, who concluded that ALL Ashkenazi (Eastern European) Jewish individuals should be tested for BRCA mutations—not just those individuals with family histories of breast and/or ovarian cancers. Since about 1 in 40 Ashkenazis will carry a cancer-predisposing BRCA mutation, genetic testing was suggested for everyone at a young age.  Then, in case a mutation is present, it is better to find out at a preventable stage.

The second article quotes the scientist who discovered BRCA’s association with cancer and who partnered on the Israeli study, Dr. Mary –Claire King. Dr. King’s statements took this one step further, as she called for screening all American woman 30 or older regardless of race or ethnic background—not just Ashkenazis!

Our inboxes have been flooded and the phones have been ringing all week with inquires about these articles.  So how do we feel about these statements? If you have been listening to the news, the media made it sound like these are new ‘guidelines’ or ‘recommendations,’ but we prefer the word ‘opinions.’ These opinions come from a good place, where people want to prevent illness, but they are also somewhat controversial and may be considered by some to be extreme.

For starters, we think it is important to take a step back and spell out what’s so important about BRCA in the Jewish community.  After that, we will get to the “PJGH response” to these studies.

We have spoken about BRCA many (many, many!) times in this blog, but we never actually told you why it is related to the Jewish community (our oversight!). BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations (mistakes in the genes) cause a significantly increased risk for breast and ovarian cancer, as well as some other cancers.  Just like there are certain mutations for other diseases that are more common in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, there are three specific mutations in the BRCA genes that are more commonly found in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Numerous studies have found that between 1 in 40 and 1 in 100 Ashkenazi Jews will carry one of those three BRCA mutations and are therefore likely at an increased risk for cancer. If someone is Ashkenazi Jewish and has a BRCA mutation, the vast majority of the time, it is one of those three mutations. Furthermore, that 1 in 40 – 1 in 100 carrier frequency holds true regardless of personal or family history of cancer. So if you take any random group of 100 Ashkenazi Jews, 1 or 2 of them is likely to carry a BRCA mutation, even if he/she doesn’t have a personal or family history of cancer.

This is a big deal, and it’s a huge community issue.

So what is our current response?

Genetic Testing at Birth-Is it too Early?

 

UntitledI recently saw a 50-something year old man for a cancer genetic counseling session. When we got to the concept that mutations in the BRCA genes may increase someone’s risk to develop breast and/or ovarian cancer, he was amazed. He said to me, “If the technology exists for someone to know his or her genetic risk to develop cancer, and there may be something to do to reduce these risks, wouldn’t it make sense to learn this information when someone is young?”

I was pleased to hear this question since it proved to me that he was really paying attention, and although he didn’t realize it, he touched on an issue which is very timely in the world of genetics and ethics.  The issue of whole genome sequencing (reading through all of someone’s genes to look for variation) is a hot topic in genetics. Currently, the reasons we might order any genetic testing are if there is an underlying medical issue for the individual, a family history of an issue, or if someone is from an ethnic group that has known founder mutations for particular diseases. When we do this sort of testing, we are looking for relevant mutations in one or more genes or chromosomes.

But recently, scientists have introduced the notion of testing the entire genome of all newborns-even those who are seemingly healthy. (Note: I am not talking about the Newborn Screening panel—AKA “heel stick test” or “PKU test”—which is mandatory in the United States, and tests for about 30-55 diseases, depending on the state).  And to make things sound even more exciting, the first baby to ever have his genome sequenced prenatally was born last month in California!

Back in November 2012, Nicole blogged about her discomfort of whole genome testing, as opposed to targeting the genetic testing to the medical issue at hand.  When we do whole genome sequencing, we are going to learn about that person’s traits, carrier status, predispositions to childhood and adult-onset disease,  and we may even diagnose a disease, possibly presymptomatically (ie- before the person even starts exhibiting symptoms). Some might think that all this information is great, since it’s better to know now than to be surprised when it happens.

Others believe that this type of testing for newborns is unethical. Here are a couple of reasons why:

1-The genes belong to the child, not the parents. Shouldn’t it be up to that child to make this decision?

2- Say we learn that the child is genetically predisposed to having Parkinson’s disease. This most likely will not happen for another 50 or so years, and it may never happen at all.  Does he want to be that person who is just waiting to get sick? This may cause anxiety, stigma, and may change the way his family and friends perceives him.

3- If someone learns from a young age that he has a genetic predisposition to a condition, he may ignore the other (non-genetic) risk factors. For example, let’s say someone learns that he has a genetic variant that leads to a high chance of developing diabetes. He may not try to eat healthy foods or exercise or go for checkups because he believes that his genes alone will determine his risk for diabetes. This is what we call “genetic determinism.”

I told my patient that he did not realize that he had opened up a can of worms and that we would need a whole new session just to discuss his question. But he definitely got me thinking.

 

Your Genes are not (always) your Destiny

crystal ball It seems that over the course of any medical show series on TV, there will inevitably be a character who has     been tested for the genetic condition called Huntington’s disease (HD). I’ve seen it a million times between        ER, Grey’s Anatomy, and House, but recently I have even seen it even in the non-hospital setting on           Breaking Bad. In fact, when I googled it, I even came across a Wikipedia page called “List of Huntington’s     disease media depictions.”

So why is Huntington’s such an appealing topic in the media? Well, for starters the progression of the disease is so steep, that it is startling.Huntington’s is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects muscle coordination and leads to cognitive decline and psychiatric problems starting at around age 40. Life expectancy in HD is generally around 20 years following the onset of visible symptoms and there is no treatment or cure. When I was in grad school, I visited the Huntington’s Disease Unit at Terence Cardinal Cooke Health Care Center. I remember meeting a woman who was in her 50s who used to be a law librarian, and also a 40-something year old man who was a former judge in the New York State Supreme Court.Both were obviously very intelligent individuals, but were now experiencing severe muscle jerks called chorea, dementia, and disturbed behavior, among many other neurological problems. I remember leaving the unit that day and calling my husband on my way out to warn him that I would be in a depressed mood.

Huntington’s disease is “100%, or completely, penetrant,” which means that people who have the genetic mutation at birth will definitely develop the disease to some degree at some point in their lives. The interesting thing is that these people are not surprised when it happens to them, because only people who have affected parents will be affected. Affected individuals have a 50% risk of passing the disease mutation to each of their children. So while not all children of affected individuals will inherit the disease, if you do have Huntington’s, you have inevitably seen one of your parents suffer from it before. There are many ethical issues that arise in the realm of genetic testing in Huntington’s families–issues such as when to test an individual, determining the psychological well-being of the individual prior to testing, disclosing this information to partners, and doing prenatal diagnosis with the possibility of selective abortion, to name a few. The combination of the disease course, severity, and these ethical issues obviously makes for good plot lines.

Luckily, most genetic diseases are not 100% penetrant. Individuals who carry the genetic mutation for diseases with “incomplete, or reduced, penetrance” are not guaranteed to develop the disease. Incomplete penetrance often is seen with familial cancer syndromes. For example, many people with a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene will develop breast or ovarian cancer during their lifetime, but some people will not. Individuals with a mutation in a mismatch repair gene associated with Lynch syndrome are likely to develop colon cancer and other GI-related cancers, but this is not definite. Doctors cannot predict which people with these mutations will develop cancer or when the tumors will develop. These familial cancers also may appear to “skip” generations due to incomplete penetrance.

While there is, at this time, nothing that can be done to prevent Huntington’s disease, the good news is that individuals with BRCA or Lynch-related mutations can take actions to reduce their risk of developing cancer.  Carriers may consider risk-reducing surgeries: female BRCA carriers may have mastectomies and/or oophorectomies, and some many individuals with Lynch syndrome will have colonic resections. Additionally, these carriers will increase surveillance with more rigorous screenings (think mammograms and colonoscopies), and many will try to alter their lifestyle with diet and exercise.

Isn’t it encouraging to know that all the stuff you’ve inherited from your parents (the good and the bad) is  not necessarily your fate?

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