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Preparing for Passover- the genetics edition

matza clipartAs everyone else in the Jewish world is gearing up for Passover by cleaning, cooking, and planning their Seders, I am thinking about how to best convince you to use the opportunity of a holiday to discuss your family health history!

Hopefully, I no longer need to convince you that gathering information about your family medical history is a worthwhile activity, but If I do, I will remind you, that far better than any genetic test, your family health history can help you and your healthcare providers determine what medical issues you are at risk for, and subsequently, how to best care for you.

Almost a year ago, we told you about a great new resource to help you start the conversation specifically related to histories of breast cancer. You can learn more at http://www.treeoflifebrca.org/

You can also use this family history tool created by the Surgeon General, or these guidelines to learn what questions to ask, and how to take your own family history. Some additional instructions or family history guides can be found on the NSGC website here.

We know that discussing your family medical history may feel like an uncomfortable and nosy task, but your family medical history is part of your heritage and has major implications for your own health, and the health of your family members.

Wishing you a happy and healthy Passover, from the Program for Jewish Genetic Health!!

Passover and the Seder: Time to be a Historian

sederPassover is traditionally the holiday of history. In fact, it is a unique time which we are told to actually be historians. The whole point of the Seder is so that we tell over the story of how we and our forefathers were slaves in Egypt, and G-d took us out. The Seder is set up to be multigenerational in that sense. Everyone is involved, grandparents, parents, children, and everyone has their own role.

Perhaps you already see where I’m going with this. Use this opportunity, gathered around with your family, to discuss and share your family medical history! Similar to the Seder, everyone in your family has a role in this, especially those who are already considered the family’s medical history “historians”.

Usually there are one or two individuals in the family who know something about the family’s medical history, but everyone else is typically clueless. I see this on a daily basis when I meet with patients and ask them questions about their family histories. I can rapidly tell the difference between those “historians” who know what medical issues run in their families, and those whose answers consist largely of “I don’t know”.

I didn’t know much about my family medical history until I became a genetic counselor and asked my mother (our family’s medical historian) all of the pertinent questions. My sisters still don’t know a lot, and their answers at a doctor’s visit will likely consist of a lot of “I don’t know”s.

Family medical history is something we all should know! It is the best predictor of future medical issues, and can help your doctors direct your care appropriately.

You can use this family history tool created by the Surgeon General, or these guidelines to learn what questions to ask, and how to take your own family history.

 

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